Depiction in a 12th century manuscript of Donatus writing his grammar.
Posted in 1689 & earlier: Medieval and Early Modern

Sedulius Scottus: philosopher poet to princes

There could be no more appropriate Irish philosopher to write about at Easter than Sedulius Scottus, at least according to another Irish philosopher Dr George Sigerson. In 1922 Sigerson’s “The Easter song : being the first epic of Christendom, by Sedulius the first scholar-saint of Ireland” was published, and in the introduction to this partial translation of the  “Paschale Carmen” Sigerson stated that Sedulius who composed it was Irish1 While this was not a pure assumption on Sigerson’s part2, and the same attribution has been made before and since, modern scholars see no reason to assume an Irish origin for this 5th century writer3.

There is no such doubt about Sedulius Scottus, whose very name betrays his origins. (Though because nothing is ever simple, he is sometimes confused with another, slightly earlier Irish Sedulius, who is known only for a commentary on Matthew, and is sometimes called Sedulius Senior to avoid confusion4 (fl. 7th–8th cent.) Oxford Dictionary of National Biography].) 

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Posted in Post 1922: Contemporary

The Philosopher’s Bookclub on Flann O’Brien’s “The Third Policeman”

The Philosopher’s Bookclub on Flann O’Brien’s The Third Policeman, an episode of the Forum for Philosophy podcast featuring Clare MoriartyPaul Fagan and David Papineau. Recorded on Tuesday 25 February 2020 at Wolfson Theatre, New Academic Building, LSE.