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26 Jan

RTE The History Show: George Boole

RTE The History Show: George Boole (25th Jan 2015)

Ahead of the Boole Inaugural Lectures, this piece on RTE The History Show (25th Jan) discusses George Boole and his legacy.

The website for the programme contains additional information.

25 Jan

In Our Time: Robert Boyle

Melvyn Bragg discusses the life and work of Robert Boyle with Simon Schaffer, Michael Hunter and Anna Marie Roos.

Melvyn Bragg and his guests discuss the life and work of Robert Boyle, a pioneering scientist and a founder member of the Royal Society. Born in Ireland in 1627, Boyle was one of the first natural philosophers to conduct rigorous experiments, laid the foundations of modern chemistry and derived Boyle’s Law, describing the physical properties of gases. In addition to his experimental work he left a substantial body of writings about philosophy and religion; his piety was one of the most important factors in his intellectual activities, prompting a celebrated dispute with his contemporary Thomas Hobbes.

For more “In Our Time” relating to Robert Boyle, see the programme on alchemy and the “In Our Time” blog.

21 Jan

George Boole 200 Inaugural Lectures, UCC, 5th Feb 2015, 6-9 pm

Depiction of George Boole in stained glass, Aula Maxima, UCC.

Depiction of George Boole in stained glass, Aula Maxima, UCC.
(c) @UCC

There will be a number of lectures to commemorate the George Boole Bicentenary. The first addressed George Boole’s legacy and is now available to watch online here.

Introduced by Desmond MacHale (Emeritus Professor of Mathematics at UCC and author of Boole’s biography), this lecture will be given by Professor Muffy Calder OBE (University of Glasgow) and and Professor Alberto Sangiovanni Vincentelli (Berkeley) and aims to being “Boole’s logic and algebra to life, showing how Boolean thought has influenced our modern world.”

This event will be held in the Boole 4 Lecture Theatre on Thursday the 5th of February 2015 from 6pm to 9pm. All are welcome. The lecture is free to attend but registration is required, please click here to register.

The event will also be livestreamed here.

For further information see the George Boole website. There will be other events held throughout the year. Visitors to Cork may wish to go on the Being George Boole Tour running from February to December 2015.

20 Jan

‘Political Thought in Ireland: the Contribution of Ulster-Scots’, Queen’s University, Thur 22 Jan 2015, 9.30am – 5pm.

political-symposium-page-001The Ulster-Scots influence on Ireland’s political landscape will explored in a symposium entitled: ‘Political Thought in Ireland: the Contribution of Ulster-Scots’. The symposium is funded by the Department of Culture, Arts and Leisure and supported by DCAL’s Ministerial Advisory Group on the Ulster-Scots Academy.

The event will be held in the School of Sociology and Social Policy at Queen’s University, 6 College Park, Belfast on Thursday 22 January 2015, 9.30am – 5pm. All are welcome to attend. The conference is aimed at those with an interest in local history and the evolution of politics in Ulster.

The conference “will feature discussions covering the history of modern Ireland, from the early role of Presbyterians in the politics of Ireland, the 1798 Rebellion, the complexities of the nineteenth-century, through to partition and beyond.”

The keynote speaker is Professor Ian McBride (King’s College London) who will lecture on the political thought of Francis Hutcheson. Dr Andrew Holmes (Queen’s University Belfast) will respond. Also in attendance will be Wesley Hutchinson, Laurence Kirkpatrick and Carol Baraniuk.

More information on Facebook and The Ulster Scots Agency. The agenda is here (pdf on Queens University website). Contact Dr John Greer james.greer@qub.ac.uk for further details. .

12 Jan

“Censorship and deception in the printing of Swift’s works 1690-1758” , National Print Museum, 15th Jan 2015.

From ECIS: There will be a public lecture at the National Print Museum entitled ‘Censorship and deception in the printing of Swift’s works 1690-1758’, on Thursday, 15 January 2015, at 6.30pm. The lecture will be given by Professor Andrew Carpenter as part of the National Print Museum’s ‘Censored’ lecture series and is free of charge

Please visit the National Print Museum website, or call 01 6603770 for further details.

12 Jan

Burke, Beauty and the Sublime

Burke on the difference between Beauty and the Sublime (Youtube). Narrated by Harry Shearer and scripted by Nigel Warburton for the BBC Radio 4 series A History of Ideas.

Burke was not the first to write about the sublime, but in his A Philosophical Enquiry into the Origin of Our Ideas of the Sublime and Beautiful (1756) he suggested for the first time that the sublime and the beautiful are mutually exclusive. For Burke, the sublime could be ugly, and thus ugliness was not merely a lack of form as Augustine and others had suggested. Unlike the pleasure invoked by beauty, Burke suggested that the sublime evoked a “negative pain” which he called delight. The sublime evokes fear and attraction. Overcoming fear to confront the sublime removes the pain, producing the intense feeling of delight.

David Berman sets the end of the Irish Golden Age of Philosophy at the publication of The Sublime and the Beautiful, the last great work of the period. For more on the idea of the Sublime see this In Our Time episode. Also see this from Existential Comics on the sublime.

01 Jan

Edgeworth Schools

Two schools set up by Maria Edgeworth (c) IrishArtHistory

Two schools set up by Maria Edgeworth
(c) Ciarán MacGonigal

Reproduced with permission of Ciarán MacGonigal @IrishArtHistory, originals here and here. Both schools, set up by Maria Edgeworth, are in Edgeworthstown. The one on the left which bears her family arms was opened in the Porters Lodge. The one on the right was the eighth and last she opened.

Maria Edgeworth (1 January 1768 – 22 May 1849) not only expressed philosophical ideas through her novels and short stories but also wrote a treatise Practical Education (1798), a progressive work that joins the ideas of Locke and Rousseau with scientific inquiry.